We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How We Make Money

We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently from our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What Was the Unusual Dying Wish of the Inventor of Frisbee Golf?

When it comes to dying wishes, some people have made fairly odd requests about what to do with their remains. Some people want to be buried in their favorite car. Others have items of personal significance buried with them, like a CD of favorite music. One strange request came from Ed Headrick, the inventor of Frisbee golf (also known as disc golf). According to his family, Headrick asked to be cremated and his ashes mixed with plastic and molded into a commemorative Frisbee.

When Headrick died in 2002, that dying wish became a reality, and a line of very special commemorative Frisbees was produced, incorporating Headrick's ashes into the plastic. The "Steady Ed Memorial Discs" are still available for sale from the Disc Golf Association's online store. All proceeds from the commemorative Frisbees go towards the Ed Headrick Memorial Museum, part of the PDGA International Disc Golf Center in Appling, Georgia.

Before he died, Headrick also made it clear that he didn't want a funeral. He said that if there was going to be a party, he wanted to attend, so his family threw "Steady" Ed Headrick a big party shortly before his death.

Fun Frisbee facts:

  • The Frisbee's original name was the Pluto Platter, and then the Flying Saucer, inspired by the UFO craze of the 1950s and 1960s.
  • The Wham-O Company estimates that some 100 million Frisbees have been sold since the mid-1960s.
  • The name "Frisbee" supposedly comes from the Frisbie Bakery in Bridgeport, Connecticut, whose pie tins could also be used as flying discs.
Amy Pollick
By Amy Pollick , Former Writer
Amy Pollick, a talented content writer and editor, brings her diverse writing background to her work at Golf Putting. With experience in various roles and numerous articles under her belt, she crafts compelling content that informs and engages readers across various platforms on topics of all levels of complexity.

Discussion Comments

Amy Pollick

Amy Pollick

Former Writer

Amy Pollick, a talented content writer and editor, brings her diverse writing background to her work at Golf Putting....
Learn more
Golf Putting, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

Golf Putting, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.